Professor David W. Coit

Professor in the Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering, Rutgers University

Professor David W. Coit

Professor in the Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering, Rutgers University

Biography

David W. Coit is a Professor in the Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering at Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, USA, and currently holds a 3-year position as a Visiting Professor at Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. His current teaching and research involves system reliability modelling and optimization, and energy systems optimization. His research has been funded by the USA National Science Foundation (NSF), U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, industry, and power utilities. He has published over 110 journal papers and over 90 peer-reviewed conference papers and has over 10 years of experience working for the IIT Research Institute (IITRI), Rome NY. He is a Department Editor for IISE Transactionsand an Associate Editor for Journal of Risk and Reliability.

David W. Coit has been awarded several NSF grants, including a CAREER grant to develop new reliability optimization algorithms considering uncertainty. He was also the recipient of the P. K. McElroy award, Alain O. Plait award and Willian A. J. Golomski award for best papers and tutorials at the Reliability and Maintainability Symposium (RAMS). He received his BS degree in mechanical engineering from Cornell University, MBA from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and MS and PhD in industrial engineering from the University of Pittsburgh.

The Evolution of System Reliability Optimization: From Dynamic Programming to Enhanced System Resilience

System reliability optimization is a living problem and methodologies have evolved with advancements in mathematics, development of new engineering technology, and changes in management perspectives. There are many different types and forms of system reliability optimization.

In this talk, Prof. David W. Coit considers the development and advancement in the fields of operations research and optimization theory, which have allowed the formalization and continuous improvement of the methods and techniques to address reliability design problems of very complex systems in different technological domains. Technological advances have naturally brought changes in perspectives in response to the needs, interests and priorities of the engineering world. The progression of ideas is organized in a structure of successive eras of analysis methods and problem domains. It started with the first rigorous reliability optimization methods, which involved dynamic programming, to current models that jointly optimize system design hardening and resilience strategies.

All session by Professor David W. Coit

Keynote:

10:40 - 11:20
Level 3 Venus Grand Ballroom